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as campaign props, if the president was serious he would sit down with harry reid and begin to address our problems. the house has acted twice. we shouldn't have to act a third time before the senate begins to do their work. >> suarez: and as the deadline ticked one day closer, the president planned to visit a virginia shipyard tomorrow to highlight again how the cuts could harm the u.s. military and civilian defense workers. >> woodruff: to help us better understand the underlying political strategy being used at the white house and on capitol hill, we turn to two journalists closely following the developments. jonathan weisman of the "new york times" covers congress, and margaret talev covers the white house for bloomberg news. we welcome you both to the newshour. margaret, to you first. for days the white house has been raising the specter of terrible things that are going to happen. slowing air travel, people being laid off their jobs. furl owes. border security. problems. now that they see e republicans aren't moving, what do they think about this approach? >> they think it's a very
this morning, majority leader harry reid was still saying it was not too late. >> we believe we have a balanced plan to remove the threat of the sequester. everybody agrees, republicans around the country, about 80% of the americans agree it's the right thing to do almost 60% of republicans around the country agree it's the right thing to do. the only republicans in america that don't agree are those that serve in congress. >> reporter: democrats offered a plan to cancel the sequester and replace it with a mix of tax increases and targeted spending cuts phased in over ten years. >> it isn't a plan at all. it's a gimmick. >> reporter: republicans derided the bill. and minority leader mitch mcconnell charged president obama has manufactured a crisis. >> look: our country has a spending problem-- a pretty massive one; most of us in the chamber at least acknowledge that fact. but we can either address the problem in a smart way, or we can do it in the way he's proposed. >> reporter: another republican- - pat toomey of pennsylvania-- said the smart way is to rule out tax hikes and let the president
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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